Home » Learn » Self-Paced Courses » NEW!! Deaf 101

NEW!! Deaf 101

This is a horizontal black & white image with photographs of seven individuals one next to each other. In the middle of the image, there is a sentence that reads as " Deaf people are not all the same"

This module is designed to provide participants with resources to increase their awareness of the ethnic and cultural diversity within the deaf community; and that there is not “one” deaf community but rather many. This module examines identity and intersectionality among deaf people from lived experiences of deaf people. This module is designed for anyone who wants to engage with deaf people. It provides participants with fundamental knowledge of identity and intersectionality as well as some tools to engage with deaf people.

Deaf 101 is designed for ASL 101 students, instructors of deaf students, professionals with deaf coworkers, or managers of deaf employees. Deaf 101 is for anyone looking for information on what being deaf means and how to interact with deaf people.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this module you will be able to:

  • Give examples of shared and individual experiences of deaf people
  • Describe examples of deaf people with multiple identities and related experiences
  • Identify strategies to cultivate positive relationships with deaf people.

This module is pre-approved for 1 NDC Continuing Professional Education (CPE) Clock Hour and 1 CRCC Clock Hour.

Save This

Other Courses

Screen Shot 2022-11-07 at 12.24.28
Professional Development Clock Hours: 1
One of many barriers to successful postsecondary outcomes for deaf people is the impact of negative attitudes and biases. Deaf people encounter negative attitudes and biases across many settings. This, along with “the historical trend of low expectations” have served as a persistent barrier to advancement in both school and the workplace. To ensure people interacting with deaf individuals don’t create additional barriers or inadvertently maintain barriers created by others, it is important to examine oneself and how one views deaf people. Understanding that there are factors pervasive across all levels of the system that inhibit deaf people from reaching their full potential can guide us to ensure equitable opportunity for deaf success — ultimately benefiting society as a whole.
Screen Shot 2022-11-07 at 08.16.45
Professional Development Clock Hours: 1
Effective accommodations make it possible for deaf individuals to both receive and convey information in a manner that is equitable to other people in the setting — making it possible for deaf people to participate in a manner that promotes inclusion. In this course, participants will learn how to plan and provide accommodations for each setting, circumstance, and interaction — ultimately making it possible for deaf people to participate in a manner that promotes inclusion, and benefits everyone involved.
Screen Shot 2022-11-07 at 08.13.27
Professional Development Clock Hours: 1
Deaf people are highly diverse in language usage, identity, race, ethnicity, and in terms of additional disabilities. Acknowledging and honoring diversity among deaf people is central to building positive interactions and relationships. This is especially true when it comes to understanding effective communication. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) explains regulations regarding effective communication are intended to ensure people, including deaf individuals, are able to communicate with, receive information from, and convey information in a manner that is equally as effective as to people without disabilities.

Need Help?

Fill out this form to get help from the NDC team.  Can’t see the form below? Click here to contact the NDC team.