Engage for Change | state

Jun 26, 2017

States play an important role in systemic change. Watch this video to see how NDC is working with state special education and vocational rehabilitation leaders across the country to share ideas, strengthen state networks, identify & take actions and create systemic change within each state. We’re honored to be working with these state leaders!

#ndc #efcstate

Video description and transcript can be seen here.

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(upbeat music)

 

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♪♪

 

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Two heads, three heads, 20 heads, are always better than one.

 

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We believe that cross-state sharing of what works is really, really

 

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valuable to states, as well as cross-state problem solving of challenges that

 

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states are facing. Oftentimes, deaf students are isolated

 

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in the classroom, and they don’t have access to role models, and they don’t

 

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have quality– the personnel may not have the skills to communicate or work with

 

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them, have good coaching skills as well, so it’s important not to let these kids

 

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fall through the cracks, so we make sure that they’re ready to graduate

 

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from high school, to be able to go into post-secondary education,

 

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training opportunities,  and employment.

 

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>> The state collaboratives is an approach that OSEP is extremely

 

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supportive of, it has been an effective approach that other technical assistance

 

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centers have used, and we believe this is the absolute positive best

 

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direction that the National Deaf Center should be going.

 

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♪ ♪

 

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>> Now I’ve been in this role just about a year now, and right

 

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when I started was my first opportunity to participate in the collaborative

 

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meeting, and I could tell that it was significantly different from anything

 

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that I had experienced before. I think that it truly fostered

 

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authentic stakeholder engagement. One of the benefits we’ve had

 

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here in the state is the opportunity for me to participate with other

 

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similarly-situated professionals in the field, who have similar supervisory

 

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responsibilities for their state. It’s very difficult to find other folks

 

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who are responsible for a particular task at the statewide level,

 

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therefore when we get together at the collaborative, it is really helpful

 

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to have someone who is working with the same set of variables to problem-

 

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solve the same important things in their own state.

 

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>> For me, as a new director, I was a little bit like a deer in the headlights

 

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so to speak, and so having that opportunity to sit with my colleagues,

 

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and our particular meeting at that time was around our SSIP and implementation,

 

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and what I got from listening to other states, regarding implementation,

 

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barriers for implementation, was kind of a thematic idea that you know,

 

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if we’re going to be changing education for the better, we’ve got to engage…

 

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site-level leadership, and so it could be anything, but that was our thing,

 

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and so I just walked away from that having an understanding that states

 

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were in the same boat as we were, it was a new understanding about

 

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that nuance of implementation. We actually problem-solve all

 

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the way to solution, which doesn’t always happen.

 

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♪ ♪

Video Description:

(upbeat music)

 [Text reads: “Engage for Change | state” in green and white; background of a building from the outside is blurry. Screen fades to black then a green background with white text “Did you know that…” shows up. The screen slides over to reveal another video of books being blurred in the background, and a pie chart in green in the foreground. It shows text that 48% of “Deaf people employed.” Another screen shows up and this time it is a bar graph with the title “Employment Rates increase with education and training” and there are four columns, “High School/GED”, “Some College”, “Bachelor Degree” and “Master Degree + Higher”. All four bars increase slightly from the left to right. The bar graph then morphs into a frequency curve graph, there are two curves, the left one is a darker green and reads “Deaf with Bachelor Degree” and the one on the right is a lighter green, reads “General Population with Bachelor Degree”. The graph on the right is higher than the left one. There is a white text that highlights the difference between the two statistics, it reads “15% education gap”. The next slide shows a green background with white text: “Engage for Change | state… States collaborate to work together and improve postsecondary outcomes for deaf individuals” then it fades to a black background with white text: “A message from Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP)” with the Department of Education logo below. There is a video of a white man in a white shirt and yellow tie. He is in an office with two flags behind him next to a bookshelf. He is sitting behind a desk with some paper, a pen, amug, and a phone on it. A lower third caption shows up and it reads: “Larry Wexler” with the following text below: “Director, Research to Practice Div. Office of Special Education Programs”]

 

Two heads, three heads, 20 heads, are always better than one.

We believe that cross-state sharing of what works is really, really valuable to states, as well as cross-state problem solving of challenges that states are facing.

[The video fades in to another person taking place of Larry’s seat, this time a white woman with a dark blue jacket with a gray blouse and white polka dots is sitting behind the desk. The lower third caption reads: “Louise Tripoli” and below it reads: “NDC Project Officer, Office of Special Education Programs”]

 

>> Oftentimes, deaf students are isolated in the classroom, and they don’t have access to role models, and they don’t have quality– the personnel may not have the skills to communicate or work with them, have good coaching skills as well, so it’s important not to let these kids fall through the cracks, so we make sure that they’re ready to graduate from high school, to be able to go into post-secondary education, training opportunities, and employment.

[The video fades back to Larry Wexler sitting behind the desk again.]

 

>> The state collaboratives is an approach that OSEP is extremely supportive of, it has been an effective approach that other technical assistance centers have used, and we believe this is the absolute positive best direction that the National Deaf Center should be going.

♪ ♪

[The video shifts to a green background with white text reading: “The National Deaf Center will work with states to…” Then the video shifts again with a green hue over a background of graphs and statistics on paper scattered on a desk with a person holding a marker. There is white text reading: “Use data to guide decision-making”. The video fades to another blurry green hue of people seated in round tables and a person presenting, the white text reads: “Engage with deaf communities” The video fades to another blurry green hue of a white male seated behind a long conference table in a meeting room, he is talking with someone off camera. The white text reads: “Form collaborative networks”. The video fades to a greenish hue of two people walking down a sidewalk outside along some buildings, with white text reading: “Achieve goals in your state”. It fades to black for a second or two, then a green background with white text appears: “Participants in similar models have reported optimistic outcomes in their states.” The video fades to black then shows a white man wearing a nice white dress shirt with a patterned dark tie under a dark blue blazer. The lower third caption reads: “Will Jensen” with the following text below: “Nevada State Special Education Director”]

 

>> Now I’ve been in this role just about a year now, and right when I started was my first opportunity to participate in the collaborative meeting, and I could tell that it was significantly different from anything that I had experienced before. I think that it truly fostered authentic stakeholder engagement.

[The video fades to black then shows a white woman wearing a nice black and blue blouse under a black blazer. The lower third caption reads: “Carol Ann Hudgens” with the following text below: “North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction”]

 

>> One of the benefits we’ve had here in the state is the opportunity for me to participate with other similarly-situated professionals in the field, who have similar supervisory responsibilities for their state.

[The video shifts to a greenish hue of a picture of a hand holding a pencil and a board full of post-it notes, with the white text: “It’s very difficult to find other folks who are responsible for a particular task at the statewide level” then the video shifts to another greenish hue picture of a hand holding a phone and another hand holding a pen on a desk with paper scattered around, with white text reading: “Therefore; When we get together at the collaborative,” then the text shifts to reveal more text: “It is really helpful to have someone who is working with the same set of variables to problem-solve the same important things in their own state.”

[The video shifts to Will Jensen sitting again]

 

>> For me, as a new director, I was a little bit like a deer in the headlights so to speak, and so having that opportunity to sit with my colleagues, and our particular meeting at that time was around our SSIP and implementation, and what I got from listening to other states, regarding implementation, barriers for implementation, was kind of a thematic idea that you know, if we’re going to be changing education for the better, we’ve got to engage… site-level leadership, and so it could be anything, but that was our thing, and so I just walked away from that having an understanding that states were in the same boat as we were, it was a new understanding about that nuance of implementation.

[The video fades to a greenish hue of a picture of a person holding a iPad mini with a pie chart, and other charts/graphs on it, with some paper with bar charts on the other hand. The white text reads: “We actually problem-solve all the way to solution, which doesn’t always happen.” Then the video fades to a greenish hue of a video of an outdoor water fountain with a building behind it, white text reading: “Let’s work together to improve postsecondary outcomes for deaf individuals in your state!” The video the fades out to white, and a NDC logo appears, with the text in black below: “National Deaf Center on Postsecondary Outcomes”. The video fades out again and the text appears: “Visit us at www.nationaldeafcenter.org” with the Department of education logo, the TA&D Network logo, and the OSEP logo below. The video fades to black.]

© National Deaf Center on Postsecondary Outcomes

Video licensed under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 International

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