Assistive Technology

Assistive technology includes a broad range of hardware and software tools to transmit information to an individual in the manner most accessible to them. Such technologies for deaf individuals can include hearing aids, cochlear implants, FM systems, loop systems, accessible telephones/videophones, visual alert systems, and much more.

Both entities and individuals who may utilize such technology can benefit from understanding the advantages and limitations of different assistive technologies. This is especially true when entities are seeking to purchase technology that is compatible to a wide range of users. Below are starter resources for learning more about various devices, software, and services related to assistive technology:

Special Topics: Assistive Technology

Topics: DSP Toolkit
Type(s): Guides
Relying on amplification devices or residual hearing alone may not be enough to access communication, especially in difficult listening situations.
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With technology always seemingly one step ahead of us, it’s easy to confuse the various telecommunication services used to visually connect hearing and deaf people who wish to communicate with each other. Three primary telecommunication services are in use today: (a) video relay service (VRS), (b) telecommunications relay service (TRS), and (c) video remote interpreting (VRI).
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Type(s): Overviews
Telecommunication technology has significantly changed the communication landscape for deaf people. For more than 40 years, text telephones (TTY) and amplified phones were the only options. Today, videophones, smartphones, and instant messaging most often replace TTY as preferred communication tools.
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Type(s): Overviews
Cochlear implants are complex electronic devices surgically implanted under the skin behind the ear. These devices use electrodes placed in the inner ear (the cochlea) to stimulate the auditory nerve of people who have significant permanent hearing loss.
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